Chiefs’ ability to keep RBs out of end zone faces test against Seahawks

Nov 9, 2014; Seattle; Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (24) celebrates after scoring a touchdown against the New York Giants at CenturyLink Field. Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports

Nov 9, 2014; Seattle; Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (24) celebrates after scoring a touchdown against the New York Giants at CenturyLink Field. Credit: Steven Bisig-USA TODAY Sports

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The Seattle Seahawks rank first in the league in yards rushing per game (170.9).

Seattle has an advantage statistically against the Chiefs run defense, which ranks 20th (115.6 yards allowed per game).

Still, the Chiefs bend, but don’t break against the run, evidenced by not allowing a rushing touchdown through nine regular-season games.

That statistic is set for a challenge from Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch, one of the league’s most physical runners. The 5-11, 215-pound Lynch leads the NFL with nine rushing touchdowns.

“We just got to swarm,” defensive lineman Kevin Vickerson said of stopping Lynch. “We have to keep him from not bouncing the ball outside too much. He likes to run inside the tackles, so we got to clog that up in the middle and just gang tackle.”

Defensive lineman Vance Walker echoed Vickerson.

“He’s a strong, hard-nosed, tough runner,” Walker said of Lynch. “Everybody’s got to bring their feet and take him down. That’s the mentality you have to have. You can’t go in there with an arm and a hand, he’ll run right through that.”

The Chiefs run defense collides against the Seattle Seahawks ground attack Sunday at Arrowhead Stadium.

It isn’t just rushing touchdowns that should concern the Chiefs.

The Seahawks come off a game with 350 yards rushing against the New York Giants, anchored by Lynch’s 140 yards and four touchdowns.

Quarterback Russell Wilson chipped in with 107 yards rushing and a touchdown, while running backs Christine Michael (71 yards) and Robert Turbin (32 yards) rounded out the ground assault.

“That’s pretty impressive, very impressive,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said Wednesday. “It wasn’t just one guy doing it. They had one that did the majority of it, but the quarterback was also involved in that, and then the other two runners were involved. So, I mean they had some guys that were putting up yards. You’ve got to be prepared for that.”

Reid, of course, remained coy in detailing exactly how the Chiefs planned to do that.

“Well, we will find out,” he said. “I can’t tell you or else they will know and they will get 300 yards. So I can’t do that.”

SHERMAN RECOGNIZED

The NFL named fullback Anthony Sherman as the AFC Special Teams Player of the Week.

Sherman, who signed a contract extension last week, recorded a forced fumble, a fumble recovery and three special teams tackles during Week 10’s 17-13 win against the Buffalo Bills.

“Congratulations to him,” Reid said.

Sherman becomes the Chiefs player to earn Special Teams Player of the Week, joining running back/returner Knile Davis, who was recognized in Week 8.

Sherman was not available for comment in the locker room.

HARRIS HAS SURGERY

Second-year tight end Demetrius Harris underwent surgery Wednesday on his broken right foot.

“He’s doing well,” Reid said, “but obviously is done.”

The Chiefs placed Harris on season-ending injured reserve Tuesday. He finished the season with three catches for 20 yards.

Harris tweeted a photo from the hospital room following his procedure.

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